Wednesday, May 27, 2015

yes. i have been baking...

a few people have written and asked where i went. i'm still here, still baking. but no new post-worthy developments. i hope you are all happily baking too!



15 comments:

  1. "Nothing post-worthy"?!?! Are you kidding! Your photos say otherwise. They are stunning!

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    Replies
    1. :) Thank you! They are all just my weekly loaves! I swear, nothing inventive.

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  2. Not sure my first comment made it through, ugh. I agree with Geof. Further I would like some input and advice and I'm hoping you'll indulge me. I am baking the sprouted Kamut® loaf from Book 3, but can't get the oven spring I desire and have come to expect. At first I thought I overproofed the primary ferment so I reduced the time, but achieved the same results, a more dense crumb but good flavor (still edible). In noticed the dough slouched, so I thought maybe I had not built up the gluten structure sufficiently (60% flour + 40% whole wheat Kamut flour), so I more actively stretched the dough, in one case using slap-n-fold at multiple turns. I obtained the same results. If there is any advice you can provide I would be in your debt. Thank you. Brian

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    Replies
    1. Slap and fold.... try to gently handle the dough instead. It really doesn't take much to build gluten in bread. The acid in the levain will do that on its own. Our folds add a little to the strengthening by keeping to gluten network organized. But frankly, if you didn't do a single fold the bread would rise just fine. Hence 'no knead' breads being all the rage. xo

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  3. Hi. I need guidance. I have been feeding my starter for 12 straight days religiously every 12 hours. It shows a little bit of activity on the bottom (air holes) but doesn't seem very foamy. It almost seemed more active the first five days than it is now. I store it in a dark closet and seal the jar. I only use Bob's dark rye and bottled water. Should I try making the levain with it?

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    Replies
    1. It generally is not foamy. Lots of air holes is fine. Mine does not foam. But gets very 'holey'. Feed it more often than every 12. I often feed mine every 5 hours. Never less than that, but for a few days, try doing: a 9am feed, 2pm feed, 7pm feed, and if you are up at midnight, one more. It LOVES to be fed. Don't feed it less than 5 hours between feedings. You might just need to kick it in the pants. Starters are resilient beasts. Mine is just on the counter. I use filtered water (brita filter, or, if not that, water that has been left out uncovered for 24 hours to evaporate the chlorine). Try the levain! All you have to lose is a few grams of flour. xo

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  4. Thank you for your reply. I haven't been on your site in weeks. I waited another 10 days and finally the air holes began appearing. It took a total of 28 days to get there, but it was worth the wait. I made two great loaves last weekend and am making bread again today. Thank you for this amazing site. I will check back in more often. :)

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  5. Hello France, I love all of your breads and just was wondering if you know where I can find these kind of flours, I'm in Canada, Ontario, Barrie..

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  6. Amazing Post! I can say that I had never seen such a varieties of baking items before. Thanks for sharing such a wonderful pics.. I wish to add some pics to my site..

    Keep Updating...
    http://www.bestbake.in

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  7. Hello France, I'm so sorry to bother you again, but when you say KA All-purpose flour in some of your recipes, that is not the unbleached all-purpose flour is it, please let me know and thank you.

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  8. Oil covered shaping board.. Hi France - Amazing breads and pictures! I was "googling" for pictures of the semolina sesame seed tartine bread. I've just baked one and it's cooling on the counter. I made a 1/3rd of the recipe, so the dough was small for my oval basket, left it in the fridge overnight and it 'spread out' to the full length of the basket. The final loaf looks good but is more flattish than risen. Your post helped me understand that this is typical of semolina flours (especially given that I ground some sesame seeds into the dough given your comments about sharp edges and gluten). But here the thing - I've always wondered why your loaves had such a beatiful rust/copper coloured crumb at times. I actually thought you could have been tweaking the photo itself. And then I saw your comment about using an oil covered surface and it all made sense. What a great technique. I've never heard of anyone doing that. Two questions: what oil do you use (olive/canola?) and other than affecting the baked colour, is the crust affected in any other way? Thanks very much! Bake happy.. bread1965

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  9. Hi France - amazing breads and pictures! I just baked and then read your Tartine semolina sesame bread entry. Great information there - thank you. But I've always wondered how you achieved that beautiful copper coloured crust! And then I saw the comment about shaping on an oil covered surface! I've never heard of that and thought what an interesting idea. Three questions - how did you decided to dot his, do you use olive oil, and how does it affect your crust other than colour? Thank you in advance - bread1965!

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    Replies
    1. It's all about controlling the temperature and toggling it during the bake. You will achieve a good, dark, even crust by learning to control the temp AND rotating the pan through the bake. I only use olive oil now for focaccia :)

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  10. Hi
    Have you ever had a levain not develop?
    Thanks
    Lisa

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  11. Hi have you ever had a levain not develop?

    ReplyDelete

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